Pre-Congress Courses

Friday, November 9, 2012

Maximize your attendance by registering for one of these pre-Congress courses held at the New Orleans Convention Center. Congress attendees may register for either course at a 50% discount.

If you have already registered for Congress, please use the printable registration form, or call Customer Service at 972-243-2272, to add one of these courses to your registration.

Course #1: Patient Safety Starts with You!

8:00 am – 4:45 pm

Course capacity is limited. Pre-registration required. Deadline: Monday, October 22, 2012, or when course is full. Approved for 6.16 hours of continuing education credits (CRCE). You must attend the entire course to receive CRCE credit; no partial credit will be awarded.

Target Audience: Respiratory therapists, managers, educators, physicians, safety officers, risk managers.

With changes in reimbursement now directly tied to quality, hospitals must now be more vigilant than ever to enhance the care provided to patients. This pre-course will focus on how hospitals can improve the safety of patients through the avoidance of never events, sentinel events, hospital-acquired conditions, and near misses.

8:00 am – 8:05 am

Introduction and Welcome

Ira M Cheifetz MD FCCM FAARC /Presiding
Ira M Cheifetz MD FCCM FAARC
Ira M Cheifetz MD FCCM FAARC
8:10 am – 8:55 am

Teamwork: Creating an Atmosphere of Patient Safety

Ira M Cheifetz MD FCCM FAARC, Duke Children's Hospital, Durham NC

The TeamSTEPPS approach has become the foundation of patient safety across the country. This program is a powerful approach to improve the safety of patients throughout an institution. This presentation will review the basic principles of this evidence-based teamwork system. Attendees will learn skills to improve communication and teamwork skills among healthcare professionals. This leadoff session will set the stage for the remainder of the pre-Congress Course.

Peter Papadakos MD
Peter Papadakos MD
9:00 am – 9:40 am

Smart Phones: Electronic Distraction or Beneficial Tool?

Peter Papadakos MD, University of Rochester, Rochester NY

The use of smart phones in the medical environment is increasing at a dramatic rate. Is this to the benefit or detriment of the patients? Are smart phones augmenting patient care by providing up-to-the-minute patient-specific data and medical literature? Or are smart phones a distraction for clinicians? Laws in many states restrict the use of phones while driving. Should there be restrictions in the patient care environment? A leading expert will review this controversial topic and offer thoughts for the future.

9:40 am – 9:55 am

Break

David A Turner MD
David A Turner MD
9:55 am – 10:35 am

Human Simulation As a Tool to Enhance Patient Safety

David A Turner MD, Durham NC

The utilization of human simulation techniques has grown exponentially over the past several years and has become an integral component of education and training programs across a wide range of clinical disciplines. Implementation of this technology is an important approach in improving processes of care and overall patient safety. This presentation will review the various modalities of simulation-based training, review the data to support the implementation of these approaches, and discuss future directions for the use of simulation to enhance patient safety programs.

David Gourley MHA RRT FAARC
David Gourley MHA RRT FAARC
10:40 am – 11:20 am

Never Events

David Gourley MHA RRT FAARC, Chilton Hospital, Riverdale NJ

Certain events should never occur in the hospital setting. But which events can truly be eliminated? Is it realistic to eliminate nosocomial infections, patient falls, pressure ulcers, and others? This presentation will discuss this controversial topic from patient safety, clinical outcome, and financial reimbursement perspectives.

11:25 am – 11:45 am

Panel Discussion

Ira M Cheifetz MD FCCM FAARC
Peter Papadakos MD
David A Turner MD
David Gourley MHA RRT FAARC
11:45 am – 1:15 pm

Lunch - On Your Own

Steven E Sittig RRT-NPS FAARC
Steven E Sittig RRT-NPS FAARC
1:15 pm – 1:55 pm

Sentinel Events, Critical Incidents, and Near Misses

Steven E Sittig RRT-NPS FAARC, Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN

Although much focus is placed on sentinel events and lessons learned, often more can be learned from near misses. Systems for reviewing and learning from sentinel events, critical incidents, and near misses will be discussed. Suggestions for implementing systems to learn from medical errors will be offered and discussed.

Anthony L DeWitt JD RRT
Anthony L DeWitt JD RRT
2:00 pm – 2:40 pm

Patient Safety Events: Should You Report It?

Anthony L DeWitt JD RRT, Bartimus, Frickleton, Robertson & Gorny, PC, Jefferson City MO

What are the risks associated with the disclosure of medical errors to patients and their families? How much of the details should be disclosed? Is full disclosure really the optimal approach? What are the true medical-legal implications of a sentinel event medical error? These emotionally charged questions will be addressed using a case-based approach.

2:40 pm – 2:55 pm

Break

John C Carlson RRT-NPS
John C Carlson RRT-NPS
2:55 pm – 3:35 pm

Expanding the Team Role in Preventing Hospital-Acquired Infections

Jon C Carlson RRT-NPS, Mercy Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo NY

Insight into the respiratory therapist’s expanded role in the prevention of infections beyond the traditional scope of practice will be discussed. Methods to enhance culture change for infection control both within and beyond the ICU, including raised awareness and attention to detail, will be reviewed. Specific strategies will be offered to impact infection prevention, improve patient safety, and augment cost-control strategies.

Marty Visscher PhD
Marty Visscher PhD
3:40 pm – 4:20 pm

Pressure Ulcers: Prevention at the Bedside Level

Marty Visscher PhD, Cincinnati Children's, Cincinnati OH

Why do pressure ulcers occur? Are pressure ulcers related to less than optimal patient care or are some truly unavoidable? Strategies to eliminate this nosocomial situation will be discussed with a focus on respiratory care devices, including noninvasive ventilation interfaces.

4:25 pm – 4:45 pm

Panel Discussion

Steven E Sittig RRT-NPS FAARC
Anthony L DeWitt JD RRT
Jon C Carlson RRT-NPS
Marty Visscher PhD

Course #2: Mechanical Ventilation 2012

8:30 am – 4:40 pm

Course capacity is limited. Pre-registration required. Deadline: Monday, October 22, 2012, or when course is full. Approved for 5.5 hours of continuing education credits (CRCE). You must attend the entire course to receive CRCE credit; no partial credit will be awarded.

OBJECTIVES: Changes in mechanical ventilation happen at lightning speed. New modes and strategies to liberate patients from ventilators come along faster than most clinicians can keep pace with. This symposium allows respiratory therapists from all disciplines to come together and learn from some of the world’s leading experts in mechanical ventilation. Don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity as our speakers will present material from patient synchrony, to disease specific ventilator strategies, ventilator discontinuation, NIV, and everything in-between. The day will conclude with a panel discussion with our experts. This is your unabated opportunity to ask our experts direct questions on topics that are most important to you.

8:30 am – 8:45 am

Introduction and Format of the Course

Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC, Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC
Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC
Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC
8:50 am – 9:25 am

Principles of Mechanical Ventilation

Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC

Understanding the underlying principles of positive pressure ventilation is critical in providing safe and effective support. Modern mechanical ventilator function can be described by the three breath variables (trigger, gas delivery target, cycle) and the logic determining the pattern of breath delivery (mode). The physiologic effects of positive pressure ventilation are largely based on the equation of motion .

Richard Branson MS RRT FAARC
Richard Branson MS RRT FAARC
9:30 am – 10:05 am

Patient-Ventilator Synchrony

Richard Branson MS RRT FAARC, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati OH

Patient ventilator interaction is important for patient comfort and success of mechanical ventilation. Asynchrony is associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation, and recognition of specific problems are key competencies of respiratory therapists. The most common types of asynchrony will be described along with potential remedies.

Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC
Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC
10:10 am – 10:45 am

Demonstration – Ventilator Modes, Mechanics and Synchrony

Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC and
John Davies MA RRT FAARC
John Davies MA RRT FAARC
John Davies MA RRT FAARC, Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC
10:45 am – 11:00 am

Break

Michael Gentile RRT FAARC
Michael Gentile RRT FAARC
11:00 am – 11:45 am

Ventilator Management of ALI/ARDS – Lung Protection

Michael Gentile RRT FAARC, Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC

One of the main goals of mechanical ventilation is to support gas exchange. Questions arise as to how to accomplish this objective without causing iatrogenic injury to the lung. This lecture will describe the clinical strategies and supporting literature to provide lung protective ventilation to patients with ALI/ARDS.

Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC
Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC
11:50 am – 12:25 pm

Ventilator Management of Obstructive Airway Disease

Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA

As with any mechanically ventilated patient, lung protective strategies should be used in the patient with obstructive lung disease. In patients with obstructive lung disease, the focus is on prevention of air-trapping and dynamic hyperinflation. Many of these patients benefit from noninvasive ventilation, as discussed in detail elsewhere in the program. Because they also benefit from inhaled bronchodilator therapy, aerosol delivery during mechanical ventilation will also be discussed.

12:25 pm – 1:55 pm

Lunch - On Your Own

1:55 pm – 2:30 pm

Demonstration – Management of Severe Hypoxemia

Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC,
John Davies MA RRT FAARC and
Michael Gentile RRT FAARC
Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC
Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC
2:35 pm – 3:10 pm

The Process of Ventilator Discontinuation

Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC

It has become increasingly recognized that most mechanically ventilated patients do not require weaning. Rather, emphasis should be placed on resolution of the underlying disease process, avoiding the inappropriate use of sedation, and performing spontaneous breathing trials. Evidence does not support the use of any specific ventilator mode to facilitate weaning. Appropriately selected patients can be extubated to noninvasive ventilation. Some patients can be liberated from the ventilator but cannot be extubated; these patients often receive a tracheostomy.

John Davies MA RRT FAARC
John Davies MA RRT FAARC
3:15 pm – 3:50 pm

Non-Invasive Ventilation

John Davies MA RRT FAARC

The use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is steadily becoming a more popular therapeutic tool for patients that have a compromised respiratory system. Technological advances have made NIV more comfortable for the patients and more effective for the clinician. This lecture will discuss: the evidence that supports NIV use, the role that the various interfaces play, ventilator options for the clinicians and finally, how to troubleshoot common ventilation problems and streamlining of the breath delivery.

3:50 pm – 4:05 pm

Break

4:05 pm – 4:40 pm

Panel Discussion - Interactive Case Studies

Neil MacIntyre MD FAARC
Richard Branson MS RRT FAARC
John Davies MA RRT FAARC
Michael Gentile RRT FAARC
Dean Hess PhD RRT FAARC