Catching Up with David Eubanks, AARC President 1979

 Updated: April 25, 2018

  Tags: AARC Members

Catching up with past aarc presidents graphic

This month in our Catching Up series, we’re learning more about David Eubanks, EdD, RRT, AARC president 1979. Eubanks, an AARC Life Member, shares details about his career path, the road to his presidency, as well as tips and advice for members interested in pursuing leadership roles in the AARC.

Strong educational foundation

Dr. Eubanks entered respiratory care at Duke University Medical Center in 1956 as an oxygen therapist and joined the American Registry of Inhalation Therapists (ARIT) with the number 211 in 1965. He then graduated from the UNC in 1962 with a B.A., the University of Miami with a MEd, and Nova University with an EdD in 1975.

Dr. Eubanks was the RT director of departments at Duke, Hendrick Memorial Hospital, John Gaston Medical Center, and Rhode Island Hospital. He also became Dean of Emergency and Critical Care at Miami Dean Community College, where he started RT and EMT programs.

He developed his AARC leadership by becoming president of the Tennessee State Society of RT, Florida State Society of RC, Rhode Island State Society of RT, and the AARC.

“Respiratory care became my passion and I wanted to make a difference by encouraging others to pursue their education and promoting the profession,” Dr. Eubanks said, reflecting on what motivated him to serve as AARC president.

During his presidency, Dr. Eubanks received the Jimmy A. Young Medal, which recognizes individuals who have made lasting and sustained contributions to the profession of respiratory care and the AARC. For Dr. Eubanks, this was one of his most memorable experiences during his presidency.

In 1994, Dr. Eubanks took on the role as Director of Education and Senior VP for the ACCP. He retired 2012, formed a Consulting LLC, and is a senior advisor to the ATS, NAMDRC, and the Respiratory Compromise Institute (RCI).

Looking toward the future

According to Dr. Eubanks, his AARC membership created an opportunity “to make contacts that opened the door for future growth.” In addition to making contacts, the journals and annual meeting helped him stay “current in the profession.”

For members interested in pursuing leadership roles in the AARC, Dr. Eubanks credits involvement as a path to success.

“Get involved at the state RC level, chair committees that make a difference, and run for elected offices at the state and national level,” he said.

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