Respiratory Therapist with inhaler

Oxygen is necessary for all aerobic life, and nothing is more important in respiratory care than its proper understanding, assessment, and administration.

Oxygen has been a cornerstone block of the profession of respiratory care since 1946. The profession of respiratory care breathed life shortly after Dr. Albert Andrews, MD, outlines the structure and purpose of a hospital-based inhalation therapy department in his book, Manual of Oxygen Therapy Techniques.

Oxygen has come a long way since that time and migrated from large H cylinders that were pushed around the hospital setting by oxygen orderlies to portable lightweight devices in patient’s homes.

In 2013, the AARC has gone back to its original roots to focus some attention on the importance of oxygen therapy. Resources that are captured on this very webpage…An Audio Book of Dr. Petty’s last work, a link to an entire journal filled with articles about oxygen in January’s issue of Respiratory Care and  a new resource; A Guide to Portable Oxygen Concentrators.
Oxy-Phile Cover

Adventures of an Oxy-phile2

Thomas L. Petty, MD, a Pulmonologist, was a Professor of Medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver and at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago. He was also Professor of Medicine Emeritus at National Jewish Health in Denver. Dr. Petty, an international authority on respiratory disease, published over 800 articles in medical journals and was author or editor of 45 books or editions.

The American Association for Respiratory Care as a long-time friend and colleague of Dr. Thomas Petty is both honored and privilege to provide his final book, “Adventures of an Oxy-Phile2,” in audio book format.

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Respiratory Care journal

RESPIRATORY CARE Journal Conference

Editor-in-Chief, Dean Hess PhD, RRT, FAARC states:
We begin the year 2013 with the proceedings of the 50th RESPIRATORY CARE Journal Conference. It is fitting that the topic of oxygen was selected for the 50th conference, as there is probably no other subject as fundamental and important for the readers of RESPIRATORY CARE. We are grateful to John Heffner and Richard Branson for co-chairing this conference.

View the Conference Procedings in the January 2013 issue of RESPIRATORY CARE.

POC Guide

A Guide to Portable Oxygen Concentrators

CRCE: 1 hour | Cost: Free for AARC members, $10 for non-members

Over the past several years, there have been some tremendous breakthroughs in the area of long-term oxygen therapy support. One of the most notable is that of the portable oxygen concentrator. Technology can be a boon or it can be a curse. Even though POC technology is still in its infancy, we are already seeing significant performance improvements in this category. Portable oxygen concentrator technology will not only liberate, it will also enable patients with chronic lung diseases to enjoy a higher quality of life by staying more active. Many of us feel that increased activity levels, with supplemental oxygen when needed, will go a long way toward minimizing expensive chronic pulmonary disease exacerbations.

Gaining all the information about your portable oxygen delivery devices (POCs) is essential for high quality management of chronic respiratory diseases with oxygen dependency. Obtaining “A Guide to Portable Oxygen Concentrators” is a good first step in acquiring the knowledge and information to assist your patients. The American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC) commissioned a survey of all POC manufacturers along with a group of experts to prepare this guide, and it was written with the patient in mind.

“We’re proud of the report and the information this puts in the hands of consumers,” said George Gaebler, AARC president. “The information on the performance and characteristics of each POC will be a valuable reference to clinicians as well.”

The Guide is now available for respiratory therapists who can earn continuing education credit by reading the document and taking a short test. This will help acquaint them with the information that consumers may inquire about when choosing their POC systems.

To obtain CRCE credit for this course: